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Merrillville, IN
Munster, IN

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Tuesday, 09 April 2024 00:00

Gangrene, the consequence of compromised blood supply to the lower limbs and feet, occurs in three primary forms, which consist of dry, wet, and gas gangrene. Dry gangrene, stemming from arterial blockage, progresses slowly and necessitates vascular intervention for blood flow restoration. This type of gangrene is often seen in patients with arteriosclerosis or diabetes. Wet gangrene is caused by an infected wound that is left untreated. Wound care for gangrene involves surgical debridement to remove dead tissue and antibiotics to combat bacterial proliferation. Gas gangrene, caused by clostridia bacteria, requires aggressive debridement and targeted antibiotics to prevent systemic spread. A podiatrist plays an important role in managing gangrenous wounds in the lower limbs and feet to keep the condition from worsening. If you have ulcerated wounds that have turned gangrenous, it is strongly suggested that you seek prompt assessment by a podiatrist and get immediate treatment to avoid loss of limb. 

Wound care is an important part in dealing with diabetes. If you have diabetes and a foot wound or would like more information about wound care for diabetics, consult with Ahmad Elsamad, DPM from The Institute of Foot & Ankle Reconstructive Surgery . Our doctor will assess your condition and provide you with quality foot and ankle treatment.

What Is Wound Care?

Wound care is the practice of taking proper care of a wound. This can range from the smallest to the largest of wounds. While everyone can benefit from proper wound care, it is much more important for diabetics. Diabetics often suffer from poor blood circulation which causes wounds to heal much slower than they would in a non-diabetic. 

What Is the Importance of Wound Care?

While it may not seem apparent with small ulcers on the foot, for diabetics, any size ulcer can become infected. Diabetics often also suffer from neuropathy, or nerve loss. This means they might not even feel when they have an ulcer on their foot. If the wound becomes severely infected, amputation may be necessary. Therefore, it is of the upmost importance to properly care for any and all foot wounds.

How to Care for Wounds

The best way to care for foot wounds is to prevent them. For diabetics, this means daily inspections of the feet for any signs of abnormalities or ulcers. It is also recommended to see a podiatrist several times a year for a foot inspection. If you do have an ulcer, run the wound under water to clear dirt from the wound; then apply antibiotic ointment to the wound and cover with a bandage. Bandages should be changed daily and keeping pressure off the wound is smart. It is advised to see a podiatrist, who can keep an eye on it.

If you have any questions, please feel free to contact our offices located in Merrillville, and Munster, IN . We offer the newest diagnostic and treatment technologies for all your foot care needs.

Read more about Wound Care
Wednesday, 03 April 2024 00:00

You don't need an excuse to have beautiful nails. Step outside without worrying about the appearance of your feet.

Tuesday, 02 April 2024 00:00

When dealing with corns on the feet, it is important to prioritize safe removal techniques, particularly if you have underlying health conditions, like diabetes. Seeking professional help from a podiatrist is essential, especially if the corns are painful or if there are concerns about infection or other complications. A podiatrist may use various methods for safe corn removal, including trimming them with a small knife or applying salicylic acid patches to soften them. These procedures are performed in a controlled medical setting to minimize the risk of infection. Additionally, the podiatrist may address underlying structural issues that can contribute to corn formation, such as bunions or hammer toes. It is important to refrain from attempting corn removal yourself, especially for individuals with diabetes or circulation problems. If you have a problem with a corn on the foot, it is suggested that you schedule an appointment with a podiatrist for its safe removal.

If you have any concerns regarding your feet and ankles, contact Ahmad Elsamad, DPM of The Institute of Foot & Ankle Reconstructive Surgery . Our doctor will treat your foot and ankle needs.

Corns: What Are They? and How Do You Get Rid of Them?
Corns can be described as areas of the skin that have thickened to the point of becoming painful or irritating. They are often layers and layers of the skin that have become dry and rough, and are normally smaller than calluses.

Ways to Prevent Corns
There are many ways to get rid of painful corns such as wearing:

  • Well-fitting socks
  • Comfortable shoes that are not tight around your foot
  • Shoes that offer support

Treating Corns
Treatment of corns involves removing the dead skin that has built up in the specific area of the foot. Consult with Our doctor to determine the best treatment option for your case of corns.

If you have any questions please feel free to contact our offices located in Merrillville, and Munster, IN . We offer the newest diagnostic and treatment technologies for all your foot and ankle needs.

Read more about Understanding Corns and Calluses
Tuesday, 26 March 2024 00:00

Flat feet, also known as pes planus, affect about 18 million adults in the United States, with an additional 8 million grappling with fallen arches. Flat feet often stem from the weakening of the posterior tibial tendon, which supports the arch of the foot. It can worsen after years of simple daily activity, like walking, running, and standing. While flat feet are normal in infants and toddlers, some individuals never develop arches, leading to persistent issues into adulthood. Distinguishing between flat feet and overpronation is important for an accurate diagnosis. With flat feet there is no visible arch whether seated or standing. Overpronation, however, is a biomechanical change in the way you walk that can contribute to fallen arches. In either case, seeking a professional evaluation from a podiatrist is essential if you suspect flat feet or experience pain related to flat feet. For a full exam and subsequent treatment plan, it is suggested that you schedule an appointment with a podiatrist.

Flatfoot is a condition many people suffer from. If you have flat feet, contact Ahmad Elsamad, DPM from The Institute of Foot & Ankle Reconstructive Surgery . Our doctor will treat your foot and ankle needs.

What Are Flat Feet?

Flatfoot is a condition in which the arch of the foot is depressed and the sole of the foot is almost completely in contact with the ground. About 20-30% of the population generally has flat feet because their arches never formed during growth.

Conditions & Problems:

Having flat feet makes it difficult to run or walk because of the stress placed on the ankles.

Alignment – The general alignment of your legs can be disrupted, because the ankles move inward which can cause major discomfort.

Knees – If you have complications with your knees, flat feet can be a contributor to arthritis in that area.  

Symptoms

  • Pain around the heel or arch area
  • Trouble standing on the tip toe
  • Swelling around the inside of the ankle
  • Flat look to one or both feet
  • Having your shoes feel uneven when worn

Treatment

If you are experiencing pain and stress on the foot you may weaken the posterior tibial tendon, which runs around the inside of the ankle. 

If you have any questions please feel free to contact our offices located in Merrillville, and Munster, IN . We offer the newest diagnostic and treatment technologies for all your foot and ankle needs.

Read more about What is Flexible Flat Foot?
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