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Ahmad Elsamad, DPM, FACFAS

June 2021

Tuesday, 29 June 2021 00:00

Nerve Growth and Morton’s Neuroma

Nerve tissue is often affected due to Morton’s neuroma. Growths can form on the tissue, and may cause pressure, pain, and discomfort. Many patients liken the sensation to having a pebble in the shoe, and some people feel a burning or numbing sensation. This condition can develop from repetitive overuse while performing specific sporting activities, or it may come from wearing shoes that do not fit correctly. Additionally, people who have hammertoes, bunions, or flat feet may be prone to developing Morton’s neuroma. Prompt treatment should begin in order to lessen existing pain. It is important to have a proper diagnosis made, which is generally done by having an X-ray, ultrasound, or MRI performed. Relief can be found when shoes that are worn fit properly, in addition to wearing custom made orthotics. There are several treatment options available for Morton’s neuroma, and it is suggested that you consult with a podiatrist who can determine what the best one is for you.

Morton’s neuroma is a very uncomfortable condition to live with. If you think you have Morton’s neuroma, contact Ahmad Elsamad, DPM of The Institute of Foot & Ankle Reconstructive Surgery . Our doctor will attend to all of your foot care needs and answer any of your related questions.  

Morton’s Neuroma

Morton's neuroma is a painful foot condition that commonly affects the areas between the second and third or third and fourth toe, although other areas of the foot are also susceptible. Morton’s neuroma is caused by an inflamed nerve in the foot that is being squeezed and aggravated by surrounding bones.

What Increases the Chances of Having Morton’s Neuroma?

  • Ill-fitting high heels or shoes that add pressure to the toe or foot
  • Jogging, running or any sport that involves constant impact to the foot
  • Flat feet, bunions, and any other foot deformities

Morton’s neuroma is a very treatable condition. Orthotics and shoe inserts can often be used to alleviate the pain on the forefront of the feet. In more severe cases, corticosteroids can also be prescribed. In order to figure out the best treatment for your neuroma, it’s recommended to seek the care of a podiatrist who can diagnose your condition and provide different treatment options.

If you have any questions, please feel free to contact our offices located in Merrillville, East Chicago, and Munster, IN, . We offer the newest diagnostic and treatment technologies for all your foot care needs.

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Tuesday, 22 June 2021 00:00

Why Do Heel Spurs Develop?

Heel spurs are the body’s natural reaction to repeated stress placed on the bottom of the heel bone where it attaches to the plantar fascia—the fibrous connective tissue on the bottom of the foot. Heel spurs are actually calcium deposits that build up on the heel bone over time due to tears, strain, and stretching of the plantar fascia, ligaments, muscles, and membrane covering the heel bone. There are several contributing factors to developing heel spurs, and the most common symptoms include pain all around and underneath the heel, inflammation and stiffness that does not get better with rest. If you believe you have heel spurs, make an appointment with a podiatrist for a full examination, diagnosis and proper treatment.

Heel spurs can be incredibly painful and sometimes may make you unable to participate in physical activities. To get medical care for your heel spurs, contact Ahmad Elsamad, DPM from The Institute of Foot & Ankle Reconstructive Surgery . Our doctor will do everything possible to treat your condition.

Heels Spurs

Heel spurs are formed by calcium deposits on the back of the foot where the heel is. This can also be caused by small fragments of bone breaking off one section of the foot, attaching onto the back of the foot. Heel spurs can also be bone growth on the back of the foot and may grow in the direction of the arch of the foot.

Older individuals usually suffer from heel spurs and pain sometimes intensifies with age. One of the main condition's spurs are related to is plantar fasciitis.

Pain

The pain associated with spurs is often because of weight placed on the feet. When someone is walking, their entire weight is concentrated on the feet. Bone spurs then have the tendency to affect other bones and tissues around the foot. As the pain continues, the feet will become tender and sensitive over time.

Treatments

There are many ways to treat heel spurs. If one is suffering from heel spurs in conjunction with pain, there are several methods for healing. Medication, surgery, and herbal care are some options.

If you have any questions feel free to contact our offices located in Merrillville, East Chicago, and Munster, IN, . We offer the latest in diagnostic and treatment technology to meet your needs.

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Bunions are bony bumps that form on the sides of the big toes, at the base of the big toe joint. They are a common deformity that can push the big toe towards the other toes and make wearing shoes uncomfortable. While bunions can be surgically corrected, your doctor will usually suggest non-surgical treatments first. These treatments won’t cure the bunion, but they will relieve symptoms and can stop the bunion from getting worse. Wearing shoes with low heels and a wide toe box is helpful for relieving pressure on the bunion and makes walking more comfortable. Wearing orthotic inserts in your shoes can help support the foot and improve its alignment. Wearing a toe splint at night immobilizes the toe and holds it in a straighter position. Putting an ice pack on the bunion can help reduce swelling and pain. If you have bunions, please see a podiatrist to learn about more treatment options and find the right ones for you.

If you are suffering from bunions, contact Ahmad Elsamad, DPM of The Institute of Foot & Ankle Reconstructive Surgery . Our doctor can provide the care you need to keep you pain-free and on your feet.

What Is a Bunion?

A bunion is formed of swollen tissue or an enlargement of boney growth, usually located at the base joint of the toe that connects to the foot. The swelling occurs due to the bones in the big toe shifting inward, which impacts the other toes of the foot. This causes the area around the base of the big toe to become inflamed and painful.

Why Do Bunions Form?

Genetics – Susceptibility to bunions are often hereditary

Stress on the feet – Poorly fitted and uncomfortable footwear that places stress on feet, such as heels, can worsen existing bunions

How Are Bunions Diagnosed?

Doctors often perform two tests – blood tests and x-rays – when trying to diagnose bunions, especially in the early stages of development. Blood tests help determine if the foot pain is being caused by something else, such as arthritis, while x-rays provide a clear picture of your bone structure to your doctor.

How Are Bunions Treated?

  • Refrain from wearing heels or similar shoes that cause discomfort
  • Select wider shoes that can provide more comfort and reduce pain
  • Anti-inflammatory and pain management drugs
  • Orthotics or foot inserts
  • Surgery

If you have any questions, please feel free to contact our offices located in Merrillville, East Chicago, and Munster, IN, . We offer the newest diagnostic and treatment technologies for all your foot care needs.

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Tuesday, 15 June 2021 00:00

Do Your Child's Feet Hurt?

Have your child's feet been examined lately? Healthy feet are happy feet. If your child is complaining of foot pain, it may be a sign of underlying problems.

Tuesday, 08 June 2021 00:00

What Does Sesamoiditis Look Like?

Sesamoiditis is a condition in which the sesamoids, two pea-shaped bones located beneath the big toe joint in the ball of the foot, are injured. Sesamoiditis is not visible to the naked eye, but can be diagnosed by a podiatrist. People with sesamoiditis typically feel a slow, steady onset of pain beneath the big toe. The pain tends to be worse when the foot is bearing weight and improves when the foot is elevated or at rest. The area directly beneath one or both sesamoid bones may be tender to the touch. The big toe will usually have a normal range of motion, but it may hurt to move it upwards. X-rays may be ordered to confirm the diagnosis and rule out other conditions, such as fractures, that can cause similar symptoms. If you suspect that you have sesamoiditis, please see a podiatrist for a proper diagnosis and treatment.

Sesamoiditis is an unpleasant foot condition characterized by pain in the balls of the feet. If you think you’re struggling with sesamoiditis, contact Ahmad Elsamad, DPM of The Institute of Foot & Ankle Reconstructive Surgery . Our doctor will treat your condition thoroughly and effectively.

Sesamoiditis

Sesamoiditis is a condition of the foot that affects the ball of the foot. It is more common in younger people than it is in older people. It can also occur with people who have begun a new exercise program, since their bodies are adjusting to the new physical regimen. Pain may also be caused by the inflammation of tendons surrounding the bones. It is important to seek treatment in its early stages because if you ignore the pain, this condition can lead to more serious problems such as severe irritation and bone fractures.

Causes of Sesamoiditis

  • Sudden increase in activity
  • Increase in physically strenuous movement without a proper warm up or build up
  • Foot structure: those who have smaller, bonier feet or those with a high arch may be more susceptible

Treatment for sesamoiditis is non-invasive and simple. Doctors may recommend a strict rest period where the patient forgoes most physical activity. This will help give the patient time to heal their feet through limited activity. For serious cases, it is best to speak with your doctor to determine a treatment option that will help your specific needs.

If you have any questions please feel free to contact our offices located in Merrillville, East Chicago, and Munster, IN, . We offer the newest diagnostic and treatment technologies for all your foot and ankle needs.

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Tuesday, 01 June 2021 00:00

Treatments for a Broken Ankle

Ankle fractures occur when one or more of the bones that make up your ankle breaks. This can cause symptoms such as pain, bruising, tenderness, swelling, weakness, numbness, and difficulty putting weight on your ankle or walking. Ankle fractures may be treated with support devices, such as a brace or cast, that immobilize and protect the affected ankle to encourage healing. If you have a cast or brace, you may need to walk with crutches for a period of time. The pain of an ankle fracture can be relieved through over-the-counter medications that your podiatrist recommends. A broken ankle may need to be treated surgically if the fracture is severe. If you have broken your ankle, it is suggested that you seek the care of a podiatrist. 

Broken ankles need immediate treatment. If you are seeking treatment, contact Ahmad Elsamad, DPM from The Institute of Foot & Ankle Reconstructive Surgery . Our doctor can provide the care you need to keep you pain-free and on your feet. 

Broken Ankles
A broken ankle is experienced when a person fractures their tibia or fibula in the lower leg and ankle area. Both of these bones are attached at the bottom of the leg and combine to form what we know to be our ankle.

When a physician is referring to a break of the ankle, he or she is usually referring to a break in the area where the tibia and fibula are joined to create our ankle joint. Ankles are more prone to fractures because the ankle is an area that suffers a lot of pressure and stress. There are some obvious signs when a person experiences a fractured ankle, and the following symptoms may be present.

Symptoms of a Fractured Ankle

  • Excessive pain when the area is touched or when any pressure is placed on the ankle
  •  Swelling around the area
  •  Bruising of the area
  • Area appears to be deformed

If you suspect an ankle fracture, it is recommended to seek treatment as soon as possible. The sooner you have your podiatrist diagnose the fracture, the quicker you’ll be on the way towards recovery.

If you have any questions, please feel free to contact our offices located in Merrillville, East Chicago, and Munster, IN, . We offer the newest diagnostic and treatment technologies for all your foot care needs.

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